Dares

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unknownhatreds:

You (3D audio) - the 1975 

WHAT IS 3D AUDIO?

It is a group of sound effects that manipulate the sound produced by headphones/speakers. This frequently involves the virtual placement of sound sources anywhere in three-dimensional space, including behind, above or below the listener.

TO LISTEN:

- close your eyes

- wear headphones!

DOWNLOAD LINK (x)

Enjoy, and thanks to the anons for the request! If any of you would like to request a song, feel free to do so here!


sleepytimetunes:

Rather Be (Originally by Clean Bandit) by The 1975


1975daily:

perfecthealy:

matty healy playing the city for the first time on the piano

I had to reblog this twice in a row


northmiamigoon:

SOMETIMES I QUESTION IF THIS IS ALL REAL THEN I GRAB ON THAT ASS AND I FIRMLY BELIEVE IT


blueeyeddd:

this is the first day of my life.

glad I didn’t die before I met you.

? From College Essay Guy: How to Write Your 150-Word Extracurricular Essay

theyuniversity:

Last week, College Essay Guy talked about choosing which extracurricular activity to write about. Continuing on that theme, he will help us with the short (but tricky)150-word extracurricular statements.

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Many colleges require short extracurricular statements. The following post will provide six tips you should “steal” when you write your essays.

First, a quick FAQ:

Q: Why do so many schools ask for these?

A: The Common App used to require students that students write a 1,000 character (approx. 150-word) extracurricular statement. When in 2013 the Common App dropped the requirement, many colleges kept it as a supplement.

Q: Do I really have to write it?

A: When students ask me this my usual response is: “Really? You’d rather not talk about that thing you’ve devoted hundreds of hours of your life to? Okay, good idea.” (I’m not actually that sarcastic, but that’s what I’m thinking.)

Q: Which extracurricular activity should I write about?

A: I write about that here.

Q: What should I say? How should I structure it?

A: Keep it simple.

a. What did you literally do? What were your actual tasks?
b. What did you learn?

With 150 words, there’s not a lot of room for much more. And while your main statement is more “show” than “tell,” this one will probably be more “tell.” Value content and information over style.

Here’s a great example:

Example 1: Journalism

VIOLENCE IN EGYPT ESCALATES. FINANCIAL CRISIS LEAVES EUROPE IN TURMOIL. My quest to become a journalist began by writing for the international column of my school newspaper, The Log. My specialty is international affairs; I’m the messenger who delivers news from different continents to the doorsteps of my community. Late-night editing, researching and re-writing is customary, but seeing my articles in print makes it all worthwhile. I’m the editor for this section, responsible for brainstorming ideas and catching mistakes. Each spell-check I make, each sentence I type out, and each article I polish will remain within the pages of The Log. Leading a heated after-school brainstorming session, watching my abstract thoughts materialize onscreen, holding the freshly printed articles in my hand—I write for this joyous process of creation. One day I’ll look back, knowing this is where I began developing the scrutiny, precision and rigor necessary to become a writer.

THREE TECHNIQUES YOU SHOULD STEAL:

1. Use active verbs to give a clear sense of what you’ve done:

Check out his active verbs: writing, delivering, editing, researching, re-writing, brainstorming, catching, polishing, leading, holding, knowing.

2. Tell us in one good clear sentence what the activity meant to you.

“I’m the messenger who delivers news from different continents to the doorsteps of my community.”

and

“I write for this joyous process of creation.”

and

“One day I’ll look back, knowing that this is where I began to develop the scrutiny, precision and rigor necessary to become a writer.”

Okay, that’s three sentences. But notice how all three are different. (And if you’re gonna do three, they have to be different.)

3. You can “show” a little, but not too much.

In the first line:

“VIOLENCE IN EGYPT ESCALATES. FINANCIAL CRISIS LEAVES EUROPE IN TURMOIL.”

And later:

“Leading a heated after-school brainstorming session, watching my abstract thoughts materialize onscreen, holding the freshly printed articles in my hand…”

The first one grabs our attention; the second paints a clear and dynamic picture. Keep ‘em short!

Example 2: Hospital Internship

When I applied to West Kendall Baptist Hospital, I was told they weren’t accepting applications from high schoolers. However, with a couple teacher recommendations, the administration gave me a shot at aiding the secretaries: I delivered papers, answered phone calls, and took in patients’ packages. Sadly, inadequate funding shut down large sections of the hospital and caused hundreds of employees—myself included—to lose their jobs. But then Miami Children’s Hospital announced openings for inpatient medical volunteers. Again, I faced denial, but then I got a chance to speak to the lead inpatient medical physician and cited my previous experience. While working at MCH, I delivered samples, took down visitor information, administered questionnaires, and organized records. I helped ease the work of the nurses and doctors, while delivering medicine and smiles to dozens of patients. I may not have directly saved any lives, but I’d like to think I helped.

So far, so good?

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THREE MORE TECHNIQUES YOU SHOULD STEAL:

4. Start with a “problem to be solved.”

Did you initially face an obstacle? In the first sentence say what it was, then in another sentence say how you worked through it. That’ll show grit. Note that this essay has not one, but two obstacles. And each time the writer worked through it in just one sentence. Brevity ftw.

5. Focus on specific impact. (Say whom you helped and how.)

Read the ending again:

I helped ease the work of the nurses and doctors, while delivering medicine and smiles to dozens of patients. I may not have directly saved any lives, but I’d like to think I helped.”

This applies to fundraisers too (say how much you raised and for whom) and sports (who’d you impact and how?).

6. Write it long first, then cut it.

Both these students started with 250-300 word statements (get all the content on the page first). Then trim ruthlessly, cutting any repetitive or unnecessary words.

Good luck!

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indiehappyhour:

Sex (Acoustic) • the 1975

Here’s a bonus track because WHY THE HECK NOT?? K so I’m obsessed and just have no self control so this is gonna have a sit right here. 



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